A Pedestrian-Friendly Guide to Miami (on Foot)

Miami can be a pedestrian-friendly city — you just need to know where to go and how to move!

 

I’ve blogged about this before, but Miami has a reputation for being a car city. Most Miamians can be found behind their tinted windshields or blasting reggaeton from their convertibles. However, being a pedestrian in Miami is not entirely impossible.

When it’s not 100 degrees with 99.9% humidity, Miami is actually a really enjoyable city to discover on foot. Here are some pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods for those days when you don’t feel like taking a bus or Uber to explore. 

 

Brickell

This urban center is quite pedestrian-friendly and reminds me of other cities in the United States where walking is the norm.

 

Brickell
It’s very easy to visit Brickell at night because this part of the city is so pedestrian-friendly! | Miami, Florida

Brickell is by far the most walkable part of Miami, in my opinion. Maneuverable sidewalks and tame-ish traffic make it possible to trek through this part of the city with minimal complications. So, the next time you’re visiting Mary Brickell Village or Brickell City Centre, consider tossing on some sturdy shoes and exploring this pedestrian-friendly neighborhood without your car.

 

South Beach

Filled with tourists (who are occasionally darting around on skateboards or rollerblades), this part of South Florida is very pedestrian-friendly, too.

 

South Pointe Park
If you want to walk around South Pointe Park, these paths make it very easy to do so. | Miami Beach, Florida

By virtue of its status as a popping spring break/vacation/tourist hotspot, South Beach is pretty much required to be pedestrian-friendly — and it is! No need to have a car over here, as popular sites and attractions such as Ocean Drive, The Bass and South Pointe Park are all accessible by foot.

 

Coconut Grove

This tranquil, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood features a state park and a bustling shopping center. So, it should definitely be on your Miami Must-See list!

 

The Barnacle
When you visit The Barnacle, be sure to walk to the bay to check out amazing views like this. | Miami, Florida

I fully believe Coconut Grove is an underrated portion of the Miami metro area, and its status as a pedestrian-friendly part of the city will hopefully give more tourists motivation to visit. Nestled just south of downtown Miami and the Brickell area, Coconut Grove is home to The Barnacle Historic State Park and the CocoWalk. The neighborhood is compact with a layout that is easy to navigate. As a result, this part of the Miami area is easy to explore on foot.

 

Little Havana

Located just west of downtown Miami, Little Havana is a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood. Visit for the Cuban-American culture and an abundance of sidewalk space.

 

Little Havana
If you were traveling around Little Havana any way besides on foot, you’d miss artwork like this! | Miami, Florida

Most visitors to Miami have heard of Little Havana, but most might not know it is very easy to access on foot. Its most famous street is Calle Ocho, which features attractions such as Domino Park and Azucar Ice Cream Company. This street and its surrounding area is pedestrian-friendly, although there are some portions of the road where crosswalks are limited. Plan your crosses accordingly!

 

Wynwood

This Miami art district is pedestrian-friendly — but only once you’re fully inside the neighborhood.

 

Wynwood
Walking around Wynwood is the only way to see the neighborhood’s famed artwork. | Miami, Florida

 

I’m too new to Miami to know if this was a problem before Hurricane Irma, but there are areas on Wynwood’s outskirts that are very dangerous for pedestrians. Especially when crossing from the Omni district or Edgewater, whole chunks of the sidewalk are missing in certain places. Once you’re in and around The Wynwood Walls, though, walking is a breeze. For the most part,  this artsy neighborhood is perfectly navigable on foot.

 

Miami is not renowned for being pedestrian-friendly. However, it certainly is possible to get around parts of the city on foot.

 

Did I miss any neighborhoods? Be sure to let me know in the comments!

(Header image: Walking down Wynwood streets. | Miami, Florida)

 

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